The Release Circle – A Glimpse behind the Scenes

Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 12:43pm

As you already know, with the new DBpedia strategy the mode of releases changed, too.  The DBpedia release process follows a three-step approach – Extraction – ID-Management and Fusion. Releases are currently published on a monthly basis. In this post, we give you insight into what the single steps of the release process comprise and what our developers actually do when preparing a DBpedia release.

Extraction  – Step one of the Release

The good news is: Our new release mode is taking shape and noticeable picked up speed.Finally the 2018-08 and, additionally the 2018.09.12 and the 2018.10.16 Releases are now available in our LTS repository.

The 2018-08 Release was generated on the basis of the Wikipedia datasets extracted in early August and currently comprises 136 languages. The extraction release contains the raw extracted data generated by the DBpedia extraction-framework. The post-processing steps, such as data-deduplication or URI-normalization are omitted and moved to later parts of the release process. Thus, we can provide direct, transparent access to the generated data in every step. Until we manage two releases per month, our data is mostly based on the second Wikipedia datasets of the previous month. In line with that, the 2018.09.12 release is based on late August data and the recent 2018.10.16 Release is based on Wikipedia datasets extracted on September 20th. They all comprise 136 languages and contain a stable list of datasets since the 2018-08 release.

Our releases are now ready for parsing and external use. Additionally, there will be a new Wikidata-based release this week.

ID-Management – Step two of the Release

For a complete “new DBpedia” release the DBpedia ID-Management and Fusion of the data have to be added to the process. The Databus ID Management is a process to unify various different IRIs identifying the same entities coined from different data providers. Taking datasets with overlapping domains of interest from multiple data providers, the set of IRIs denoting the entities in the source datasets are determined heuristically (e.g. excluding RDF/OWL types/classes). Afterwards, these selected IRIs a numeric primary key, the ‘Singleton ID’. The core of the ID Management process happens in the next step: Based on the large set of owl:sameAs assertions in the input data with high confidence, the connected components induced from the corresponding sameAs-graph is computed. In other words: The groups of all entities from the input datasets (transitively) reachable from one to another are determined. We dubbed these groups the sameAs-clusters. For each sameAs-cluster we pick one member as representant, which determines the ‘Cluster ID’ or ‘Global Identifier’ for all cluster members.

Apart from being an essential preparatory step for the Fusion, these Global Identifiers serve purpose in their own right as unified Linked Data identifiers for groups of Linked Data entities that should be viewed as equivalent or ‘the same thing’.

A processing workflow based on Apache Spark to perform the process described on above for large quantities of RDF input data is already in place and has been run successfully for a large set of DBpedia inputs consisting of:

 

Fusion – Step three of the Release

Based on the extraction and the ID-Management, the Data Fusion finalizes the last step of the  DBpedia release cycle. With the goal of improving data quality and data coverage, the process uses the DBpedia global IRI clusters to fuse and enrich the source datasets. The fused data contains all resource of the input datasets. The fusion process is based on a functional property decision to decide the number of selected values ( owl:FunctionalProperty determination ). Further, the value selection for this functional properties is based on a preference dependent on the originated source dataset. For example, preferred values for En-DBpedia over DE-DBpedia.

The enrichment part of the process improves entity-properties and -values coverage for resources only contained in the source data. Furthermore, we create provenance data to keep track of the origin of each triple. This provenance data is also used for the http-based http://global.dbpedia.org resource view.

At the moment the fused and enriched data is available for the generic, and mapping-based extractions. More datasets are still in progress.  The DBpedia-fusion data is uploading to http://downloads.dbpedia.org/repo/dev/fusion/

 

Please note we are still in the midst of the beta testing for our data release tool, so in case you do come across any errors, reporting them to us is much appreciated to fuel the testing process.

Further information regarding the releases progress can be found here: http://dev.dbpedia.org/

Next steps

We will add more releases to the repository on a monthly basis aiming for a bi-weekly release mode as soon as possible. In between the intervals, any mistakes or errors you find and report in this data can be fixed for the upcoming release. 

Currently, the generated metadata in the DataID-file is not stable. This will fluctuate and still needs to be improved and will change in the near future. 

This blog post was written with the help our DBpedia developers Robert Bielinski, Markus Ackermann and Marvin Hofer who are responsible for the work done with respect to the DBpedia releases. We like to thank them for the great work they have done, so far. Chapeau.

 

Yours DBpedia Association

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Retrospective: GSoC 2018

Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 4:01pm

With all the beta-testing, the evaluations of the community survey part I and part II and the preparations for the Semantics 2018 we lost almost sight of telling you about the final results of GSoC 2018. Following we present you a short recap of this year’s students and projects that made it to the finishing line of GSoC 2018.

 

Et Voilà

We started out with six students that committed to GSoC projects. However, in the course of the summer, some dropped out or did not pass the midterm evaluation. In the end, we had three finalists that made it through the program.

Meet Bharat Suri

… who worked on “Complex Embeddings for OOV Entities”. The aim of this project was to enhance the DBpedia Knowledge Base by enabling the model to learn from the corpus and generate embeddings for different entities, such as classes, instances and properties.  His code is available in his GitHub repository. Tommaso Soru, Thiago Galery and Peng Xu supported Bharat throughout the summer as his DBpedia mentors.

Meet Victor Fernandez

.. who worked on a “Web application to detect incorrect mappings across DBpedia’s in different languages”. The aim of his project was to create a web application and API to aid in automatically detecting inaccurate DBpedia mappings. The mappings for each language are often not aligned, causing inconsistencies in the quality of the RDF generated. The final code of this project is available in Victor’s repository on GitHub. He was mentored by Mariano Rico and Nandana Mihindukulasooriya.

Meet Aman Mehta

.. whose project aimed at building a model which allows users to query DBpedia directly using natural language without the need to have any previous experience in SPARQL. His task was to train a Sequence-2-Sequence Neural Network model to translate any Natural Language Query (NLQ) into the corresponding sentence encoding SPARQL query. See the results of this project in Aman’s GitHub repositoryTommaso Soru and Ricardo Usbeck were his DBpedia mentors during the summer.

Finally, these projects will contribute to an overall development of DBpedia. We are very satisfied with the contributions and results our students produced.  Furthermore, we like to genuinely thank all students and mentors for their effort. We hope to be in touch and see a few faces again next year.

A special thanks goes out to all mentors and students whose projects did not make it through.

GSoC Mentor Summit

Now it is the mentors’ turn to take part in this year GSoC mentor summit, October 12th till 14th. This year, Mariano Rico and Thiago Galery will represent DBpedia at the event. Their task is to engage in a vital discussion about this years program, about lessons learned, highlights and drawbacks they experienced during the summer. Hopefully, they return with new ideas from the exchange with mentors from other open source projects. In turn, we hope to improve our part of the program for students and mentors.

Sit tight, follow us on Twitter and we will update you about the event soon.

Yours DBpedia Association

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DBpedia Chapters – Survey Evaluation – Episode Two

Tuesday, October 2, 2018 - 5:38pm

Welcome back to part two of the evaluation of the surveys, we conducted with the DBpedia chapters.

Survey Evaluation – Episode Two

The second survey focused on technical matters. We asked the chapters about the usage of DBpedia services and tools, technical problems and challenges and potential reasons to overcome them.  Have a look below.

Again, only nine out of 21 DBpedia chapters participated in this survey. And again, that means, the results only represent roughly 42% of the DBpedia chapter population

The good news is, all chapters maintain a local DBpedia endpoint. Yay! More than 55 % of the chapters perform their own extraction. The rest of them apply a hybrid approach reusing some datasets from DBpedia releases and additionally, extract some on their own.

Datasets, Services and Applications

In terms of frequency of dataset updates, the situation is as follows:  44,4 % of the chapters update them once a year. The answers of the remaining ones differ in equal shares, depending on various factors. See the graph below. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When it comes to the maintenance of links to local datasets, most of the chapters do not have additional ones. However, some do maintain links to, for example, Greek WordNet, the National Library of Greece Authority record, Geonames.jp and the Japanese WordNet. Furthermore, some of the chapters even host other datasets of local interest, but mostly in a separate endpoint, so they keep separate graphs.

Apart from hosting their own endpoint, most chapters maintain one or the other additional service such as Spotlight, LodLive or LodView.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moreover,  the chapters have additional applications they developed on top of DBpedia data and services.

Besides, they also gave us some reasons why they were not able to deploy DBpedia related services. See their replies below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DBpedia Chapter set-up

Lastly, we asked the technical heads of the chapters what the hardest task for setting up their chapter had been.  The answers, again, vary as the starting position of each chapter differed. Read a few of their replies below.

The hardest technical task for setting up the chapter was:

  • to keep virtuoso up to date
  • the chapter specific setup of DBpedia plugin in Virtuoso
  • the Extraction Framework
  • configuring Virtuoso for serving data using server’s FQDN and Nginx proxying
  • setting up the Extraction Framework, especially for abstracts
  • correctly setting up the extraction process and the DBpedia facet browser
  • fixing internationalization issues, and updating the endpoint
  • keeping the extraction framework working and up to date
  • updating the server to the specific requirements for further compilation – we work on Debian

 

Final  words

With all the data and results we gathered, we will get together with our chapter coordinator to develop a strategy of how to improve technical as well as organizational issues the surveys revealed. By that, we hope to facilitate a better exchange between the chapters and with us, the DBpedia Association. Moreover, we intend to minimize barriers for setting up and maintaining a DBpedia chapter so that our chapter community may thrive and prosper.

In the meantime, spread your work and share it with the community. Do not forget to follow and tag us on Twitter ( @dbpedia ). You may also want to subscribe to our newsletter.

We will keep you posted about any updates and news.

Yours

DBpedia Association

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DBpedia Chapters – Survey Evaluation – Episode One

Wednesday, September 26, 2018 - 10:31am

DBpedia Chapters – Challenge Accepted

The DBpedia community currently comprises more than 20 language chapters, ranging from  Basque, Japanese to Portuguese and Ukrainian. Managing such a variety of chapters is a huge challenge for the DBpedia Association because individual requirements are as diverse as the different languages the chapters represent. There are chapters that started out back in 2012 such as DBpediaNL. Others like the Catalan chapter are brand new and have different haves and needs.

So, in order to optimize chapter development, we aim to formalize an official DBpedia Chapter Consortium. It permits a close dialogue with the chapters in order to address all relevant matters regarding communication, organization as well as technical issues. We want to provide the community with the best basis to set up new chapters and to maintain or develop the existing ones.

Our main targets for this are to: 

  • improve general chapter organization,
  • unite all DBpedia chapters with central DBpedia,
  • promote better communication and understanding and,
  • create synergies for further developments and make easier the access to information about which is done by all DBpedia bodies

As a first step, we needed to collect information about the current state of things.  Hence, we conducted two surveys to collect the necessary information. One was directed at chapter leads and the other one at technical heads. 

In this blog-post, we like to present you the results of the survey conducted with chapter leads.  It addressed matters of communication and organizational relevance. Unfortunately, only nine out of 21 chapters participated, so the respective outcome of the survey speaks only for roughly 42% of all DBpedia chapters.

Chapter-Survey  – Episode One

Most chapters have very little personnel committed to the work done for the chapter, due to different reasons. 66 % of the chapters have only one till four people being involved in the core work. Only one chapter has about ten people working on it.

Overall, the chapters use various marketing channels for promotion, visibility and outreach. The website as well as event participation, Twitter and Facebook are among the most favourite channels they use. 

The following chart shows how chapters currently communicate organizational and communication issues in their respective chapter and to the DBpedia Association.

 

 

The second one explicit that ⅓ of the chapters favour an exchange among chapters and with the DBpedia Association via the discussion mailing list as well as regular chapter calls.

 

The survey results show that 66,6% of the chapters currently do not consider their current mode of communication efficient enough. They think that their communication with the DBpedia Association should improve.

 

As pointed out before, most chapters only have little personnel resources. It is no wonder that most of them need help to improve the work and impact of chapter results. The following chart shows the kind of support chapters require to improve their overall work, organization and communication. Most noteworthy, technical, marketing and organization support are hereby the top three aspects the chapters need help with. 

 

 

The good news is all of the chapters maintain a DBpedia Website. However, the frequency of updates varies among them. See the chart on the right.

 

 

 

Earlier this year, we announced that we like to align all chapter websites with the main DBpedia website. That includes a common structure and a corporate design, similar to the main one.  Above all, this is important for the overall image and recognition factor of DBpedia in the tech community. With respect to that, we inquired whether chapters would like to participate in an alignment of the websites or not.

 

 

 

With respect to marketing support, the chapters require from the Association, more than 50% of the chapters like to be frequently promoted via the main DBpedia twitter channel.

 

 

Good news: just forward us your news or tag us with @dbpedia and we will share ’em.

Almost there.

Finally, we asked about chapters requirements to improve their work and, the impact of their chapters’ results. 

 

Bottom line

All in all, we are very grateful for your contribution. Those data will help us to develop a strategy to work towards the targets mentioned above. We will now use this data to conceptualize a little program to assist chapters in their organization and marketing endeavours. Furthermore, the information given will also help us to tackle the different issues that arose, implement the necessary support and improve chapter development and chapter visibility.

In episode two, we will delve into the results of the technical survey. Sit tight and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or subscribe to our newsletter.

Finally, one last remark. If you want to promote news of your chapter or otherwise like to increase its visibility, you are always welcome to:

  • forward us the respective information to be promoted via our marketing channels 
  • use your own Twitter channel and tag your post with @dbpedia,  so we can retweet your news. 
  • always use #dbpediachapters

Looking forward to your news.

Yours

DBpedia Association

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Grüezi Community!

Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 8:53am

More than 110 DBpedia enthusiasts joined the Community Meeting in Vienna.

After the success of the last two community meetings in Amsterdam and Leipzig, we thought it is time to meet you at the SEMANTiCS conference again. This year’s SEMANTiCS opened with the DBpedia Day on September 10th, 2018 in Vienna.

First and foremost, we would like to thank the Institute for Applied Informatics for supporting our community and many thanks to the Technical University Vienna and the SEMANTiCS for hosting our community meeting.

Opening Session
Javier Fernández

Javier David Fernández García, Vienna University of Economics, opened the meeting with his keynote Linked Open Data cloud – act now before it’s too late. He reflected on challenges towards arriving at a truly machine-readable and decentralized Web of Data. Javier reviewed the current state of affairs, highlighted key technical and non-technical challenges, and outlined potential solution strategies.

The second keynote speaker was Mathieu d’Aquin, Professor of Informatics at the Insight Centre for Data Analytics at NUI Galway. Mathieu, who is specialized in data analytics, completed the meeting with his keynote Dealing with Open Domain Data.

Mathieu d’Aquin

 

Showcase Session
Beyza Yaman

Patrik Schneider started the DBpedia Showcase Session with his presentation of the “NII (Japan) Research Showcase – A Knowledge Graph Management Framework for DBpedia”. Shortly after, Jan Forberg, from AKSW/KILT Leipzig, promoted the usage of WebIDs in a short how-to tutorial session. Adam Sanchez, from University Grenoble Alpes, talked about RDFization of a relational database from medicine domain by using Ontop. Followed by another presentation by Beyza Yaman, University of Genoa, talking about Exploiting Context-Dependent Quality Metadata for Linked Data Source Selection. Afterwards, Robert Bielinski, from AKSW/KILT Leipzig, introduced the new DBpedia release circle by using Apache Spark. Closing the Showcase Session, Tomas Kliegr, University of Economics Prague, presented a showcase using DBpedia to study cognitive biases affecting interpretation of machine learning results.

 

For further details of the presentations follow the links to the slides.

  • WebID Creation by Jan Forberg, AKSW/KILT slides
  • RDFization by Adam Sanchez, Université Grenoble Alpes slides
  • Exploiting Context-Dependent Quality Metadata by Beyza Yaman, University of Genoa slides
  • Extracting Data using Apache Spark by Robert Bielinski, AKSW/KILT slides
  • Using DBpedia to study cognitive biases affecting interpretation of machine learning results by Tomas Kliegr, University of Economics Prague slides
Parallel Session
Gary Munnelly

As a regular part of the DBpedia Community Meeting, we had two parallel sessions in the afternoon where DBpedians can discuss technical issues. Participants interested in NLP-related topics joined the NLP & DBpedia session. Milan Dojchinovski (AKSW/KILT) chaired this session with four very stimulating talks. Hereafter you will find all presentations given during this session:

 

Diego Moussallem

At the same time, the DBpedia Association Hour provided a platform for the community to discuss technical questions and especially the DBpedia databus. Sebastian Hellmann presented the DBpedia databus and explained the advantages of global IDs. Shortly after, Marvin Hofer (AKSW/KILT) demonstrated the new DBpedia global ID webinterface. Please find his slides here.

 

Afternoon Track
Enno Meijers

The 12th edition of the DBpedia Community Meeting also covered a special chapter session, chaired by Enno Meijers, from the Dutch DBpedia Language Chapter. The speakers presented the latest technical or organizational developments of their respective chapter.

Following, you find a list of all presentations of this session:

 

This session has mainly created an exchange platform for the different DBpedia chapters. For the first time, representatives of the European chapters discussed problems and challenges of DBpedia from their point of view. Furthermore, tools, applications and projects were presented by each chapter.

Jens Grivolla

Summing up, the 12th DBpedia Community Meeting brought together more than 110 DBpedia enthusiasts from Europe who engaged in vital discussions about Linked Data, the DBpedia databus as well as DBpedia use cases and services.

 

In case you missed the event, all slides and presentations are also available on our Website. Further insights, feedback and photos about the event are available on Twitter via #DBpediaDay.

We are now looking forward to more DBpedia meetings in the next years. So, stay tuned and check Twitter, Facebook and the Website or subscribe to our Newsletter for latest news and updates.

Yours

DBpedia Association

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Beta-Test Updates

Thursday, September 13, 2018 - 11:04am

While everyone at the DBpedia Association was preparing for the SEMANTiCS Conference in Vienna, we also managed to reach an important milestone regarding the beta-test for our data release tool.

First and foremost, already 3500 files have been published with the plugin. These files will be part of the new DBpedia release and are available on our LTS repository.

Secondly, the documentation of the testing has been brought into good shape. Feel free to drop by and check it out.
Thirdly, we reached our first interoperability goal. The current metadata is sufficient to produce RSS 1.0 feeds. See here for further information. We also defined a loose roadmap on top of the readme, where interoperability to DCAT and DCAT-AP has high priority.

 

Now we have some time to support you and work one on one and also prepare the configurations to help you set up the data releases. Lastly, we already received data from DNB and SUMO, so we will start to look into these more closely.

Thanks to all the beta-testers for your nice work.

We keep you posted.

Yours

DBpedia Association

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Meet the DBpedia Chatbot

Wednesday, August 22, 2018 - 12:33pm

This year’s GSoC is slowly coming to an end with final evaluations already being submitted. In order to bridge the waiting time until final results are published, we like to draw your attention to a former project and great tool that was developed during last years’ GSoC.

Meet the DBpedia Chatbot. 

DBpedia Chatbot is a conversational Chatbot for DBpedia which is accessible through the following platforms:

  1. A Web Interface
  2. Slack
  3. Facebook Messenger

Main Purpose

The bot is capable of responding to users in the form of simple short text messages or through more elaborate interactive messages. Users can communicate or respond to the bot through text and also through interactions (such as clicking on buttons/links). There are 4 main purposes for the bot. They are:

  1. Answering factual questions
  2. Answering questions related to DBpedia
  3. Expose the research work being done in DBpedia as product features
  4. Casual conversation/banter
Question Types

The bot tries to answer text-based questions of the following types:

Natural Language Questions
  1. Give me the capital of Germany
  2. Who is Obama?
Location Information
  1. Where is the Eiffel Tower?
  2. Where is France’s capital?
Service Checks

Users can ask the bot to check if vital DBpedia services are operational.

  1. Is DBpedia down?
  2. Is lookup online?
Language Chapters

Users can ask basic information about specific DBpedia local chapters.

  1. DBpedia Arabic
  2. German DBpedia
Templates

These are predominantly questions related to DBpedia for which the bot provides predefined templatized answers. Some examples include:

  1. What is DBpedia?
  2. How can I contribute?
  3. Where can I find the mapping tool?
Banter

Messages which are casual in nature fall under this category. For example:

  1. Hi
  2. What is your name?

if you like to have a closer look at the internal processes and how the chatbot was developed, check out the DBpedia GitHub pages. 

DBpedia Chatbot was published on wiki.dbpedia.org and is one of many other projects and applications featuring DBpedia.

Powered by WPeMatico

In case you want your DBpedia based tool or demo to publish on our website just follow the link and submit your information, we will do the rest.

 

Yours

DBpedia Association

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DBpedia Entity – Standard Test Collection for Entity Search over DBpedia

Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 3:07pm

Today we are featuring DBpedia Entity, in our blog series of introducting interesting DBpedia applications and tools to the DBpedia community and beyond. Read on and enjoy.

DBpedia-Entity is a standard test collection for entity search over the DBpedia knowledge base. It is meant for evaluating retrieval systems that return a ranked list of entities (DBpedia URIs) in response to a free text user query.

The first version of the collection (DBpedia-Entity v1) was released in 2013, based on DBpedia v3.7 [1]. It was created by assembling search queries from a number of entity-oriented benchmarking campaigns and mapping relevant results to DBpedia. An updated version of the collection, DBpedia-Entity v2, has been released in 2017, as a result of a collaborative effort between the IAI group of the University of Stavanger, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Wayne State University, and Carnegie Mellon University [2]. It has been published at the 40th International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval (SIGIR’17), where it received a Best Short Paper Honorable Mention Award. See the paper and poster.

DBpedia Entity was published on wiki.dbpedia.org and is one of many other projects and applications featuring DBpedia.

Powered by WPeMatico

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Beta-tests for the DBpedia Databus commence

Tuesday, August 7, 2018 - 10:56am

Finally, we are proud to announce that the beta-testing of our data release tool for data releases on the DBpedia Databus is about to start.

In the past weeks our developers at DBpedia  have been devloping a new data release tool to release datasets on the DBpedia Databus. In that context we are still looking for beta-testers who have a dataset they wish to release.  Sign up here and benefit from an increased visibility for your dataset and your work done.

We are now preparing the first internal test with our own dataset to ensure the data release tool is ready for the testers. During the testing process, beta-testers will discuss occuring problems, challenges and ideas for improvement via the DBpedia #releases channel on Slack to profit from each other’s knowledge and skills. Issues are documented via GitHub.

The whole testing process for the data release tool follows a 4-milestones plan:

Milestone One: Every tester needs to have a WebID to release data on the DBpedia Databus. In case you are interested in how to set up a WebID, our tutorial will help you a great deal.

Milestone Two: For their datasets, testers will generate DataIDs, that provide  detailed descriptions of the datasets and their different manifestations as well as relations to agents like persons or organizations, in regard to their rights and responsibilities.

Milestone Three: This milestone is considered as achieved, if an RSS feed feature can be genreated. Additionally, bugs, that arose during the previous phases should have been fixed. We also want to collect the testers particular demands and wishes that would benefit the tool or the process. A second release can be attempted to check how integrated fixes and changes work out.

Milestone Four: This milestone marks the final upload of the dataset to the DBedia Databus which is hopefully possible in about 3 weeks.

 

In case you want to get one of the last spots in the beta-testing team, just sign up here and get yourself a WebID and start testing.

Looking forward to working with you…

Yours,

DBpedia Association

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Call for Participation: 12th DBpedia Community Meeting in Vienna

Tuesday, July 17, 2018 - 10:23am

We are happy to announce that the 12th DBpedia Community Meeting will be held in Vienna, Austria. At the beginning of SEMANTiCS 2018, Sep 10-13, the DBpedia Community will get together on the 10th of September for the DBpedia Day.

Highlights

– Keynote presentation by Javier David Fernández García (WU Vienna)

– Keynote presentation by Mathieu d’Aquin (NUI Galway)

– DBpedia Association hour

– DBpedia Chapter Session

– Tell us what cool things you do with DBpedia: https://goo.gl/forms/ngRWCjgH9ocDCrEb2

Quick Facts

– Web URL: http://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/Vienna2018

– Hashtag: #DBpediaDay

– When: September 10th, 2018

– Where: Gußhaus Campus of Vienna’s Technical University, Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Vienna, Austria

– Call for Contribution: Submit your proposal in our form.

Tickets

– Attending the DBpedia Community Meeting costs €50 (excl. registration fee and VAT). DBpedia members get free admission, please contact your nearest DBpedia chapter or the DBpedia Association for a promotion code.

– You need to buy a ticket. Please check all details here: https://2018.semantics.cc/registration

Schedule

Please check our schedule for the 12th DBpedia Community meeting here: https://wiki.dbpedia.org/meetings/Vienna2018

Pre-event

– When: September 9th, 2018

– Where: SBA Research, Favoritenstraße 16, 1040 Vienna, Austria

– What: We will discuss the development strategy of the DBpedia Association with members of the DBpedia chapters. You are cordially invited to participate in the discussion to shape the strategy of DBpedia.

– Registration can be made by email.

 

Sponsors and Acknowledgments

– Technical University Wien (https://www.tuwien.ac.at/en/)

– Institute for Applied Informatics (https://infai.org/)

– OpenLink Software (http://www.openlinksw.com/)

– SEMANTiCS Conference Sep 10-13, 2018 in Vienna (https://2018.semantics.cc/)

– SBA Research (https://www.sba-research.org/)

In case you want to sponsor the 12th DBpedia Community Meeting, please contact the DBpedia Association via dbpedia@infai.org.

 

Organisation

– Julia Holze, DBpedia Association

– Sebastian Hellmann, AKSW/KILT, DBpedia Association

 

We are looking forward to meeting you in Vienna!

For latest news and updates check Twitter, Facebook and our Website or subscribe to our newsletter.

Your DBpedia Association

 

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